very vs very much

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  • p@tty
    Participant
    31 December, 2010 at 16:42
    • Total posts: 2

    I feel VERY confused about this point of grammar. (which is true)

    I’m VERY worried about what’s happening to the Euro.

    My wife is VERY frightened of snakes.

    BUT

    I’ve been VERY MUCH helped by the support you have given me.

    Michael Swan is a VERY MUCH admired writer.

    Which grammar rule, is there is one, determines the use of one or the other form??

    Thanks in advance and HAPPY NEW YEAR to all!!!!

    acronymkid
    Participant
    27 February, 2011 at 19:55
    • Total posts: 1

    Reply To: very vs very much

    Thank you very much.

    Here, very much is emphasis and they very much go together. Otherwise, you would just say "thank you."

    Or, he is a very good runner. No need for much here.

    p@tty
    Participant
    28 February, 2011 at 10:07
    • Total posts: 2

    Reply To: very vs very much

    Thank you very much! :)

    comvigo
    Participant
    30 December, 2011 at 10:17
    • Total posts: 2

    Reply To: very vs very much

    Very and very much both are different words, and use at different requirement as above post…..

    ruthkeith
    Participant
    12 November, 2014 at 10:00
    • Total posts: 2

    Reply To: very vs very much

    I have been told once that the use of "much" is a native English and not mainstream! Is it true?

    Muhammad Irshad
    Participant
    7 January, 2015 at 9:33
    • Total posts: 1

    Reply To: very vs very much

    It wouldn’t be wrong and you may probably hear people say that. But it sounds more smooth to the ears without "much".
    That said, there are many examples which are normal when used in the pattern you pointed out. i.e.

    He was found very much alive when they found him in the woods.

    Her house was very much intact from the tornado.

    She was pretty much left to fend for myself.

    johncostas
    Participant
    19 May, 2016 at 10:48
    • Total posts: 1

    Thank You Very much!!

    BloomingMarvelous
    Participant
    22 September, 2016 at 16:44
    • Total posts: 2

    You woudn’t use very with comparative adjectives – you would choose much, far, very much, etc.

    Examples using very much with comparative adjectives are:

    She is very much better today
    Her boyfriend is very much older than her

    Hope that helps :)

    LindaMerrill
    Participant
    24 March, 2017 at 13:17
    • Total posts: 6

    The obvious answer is that there’s no universal rule. They’re mostly idiomatic and irregular, and tradition governs which ones allow very versus very much.

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