Too/Enough

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  • Judit
    Participant
    7 December, 2007 at 10:45
    • Total posts: 1

    Hi Colleagues All Around the World, got a question for you.

    Have you got a clear explanation to the examples beneath?

    1. "Three hours are too many/is too much (time) to write a postcard."
    (We know that ‘time’ is uncountable therefore we should use ‘too much’ but ‘3 hours’ is/are countable and in plural….so i’m getting confused here.)

    2. "25 grams of flour is not enough to bake a cake." (We know that ‘flour’ is uncountable…but 25 grams of it should be countbale…so shall we say ‘are not enough" here?? But still "is" sounds better to my ears.)

    3. "35 dollars are not enough for a plane ticket to N.Y." (Money is uncountable…but 35 of it isn’t…so…’are’ should be correct here.)

    How would you put these 3 sentences above correctly using ‘too/enough’?

    I’d prefer you answered them in a mail. My email add: juditdekany@yahoo.com

    Thanks a lot,
    Judit

    sol_net
    Participant
    16 February, 2008 at 11:44
    • Total posts: 3

    Reply To: Too/Enough

    1. "Three hours are too many/is too much (time) to write a postcard."

    2. "25 grams of flour is not enough to bake a cake."

    3. "35 dollars are not enough for a plane ticket to N.Y."

    In example 1, too many/much is qualifying the noun "time", which is uncountable.

    In example 2, I think we are focusing on 25 grams of flour as one whole amount – when we think about the flour, we do not think about the individual grams, but the amount of flour as a whole. The same goes for example 3 – we consider the amount of 35 dollars as one whole amount, a a singular entity, rather than as 35 individual dollars.

    That’s my reading of it – anyone like to add / disagree?!

    Pruthiraj
    Participant
    30 July, 2010 at 6:46
    • Total posts: 9

    Reply To: Too/Enough

    Too and Enough are used with adjectives and indicate degree. Too means more than necessary, and it precedes the adjective. Enough means sufficient and usually follows the adjective.
    He is too old to ride the Merry-Go-Round.
    She has too much money.
    Tony was tall enough to play on the basketball team.
    They were smart enough to pass the test. (NOT: enough tall)
    (NOT: enough smart)
    Enough can also be used with nouns. In such cases, enough usually precedes the word it modifies.
    I have enough money for the CD player.
    I don’t have enough (money) for the computer.
    There aren’t enough people to make a team.
    In some cases, enough can stand alone.
    I have had enough of this nonsense.
    Enough is enough!
    Common problems include using very in place of too or enough.
    She is very young to drink alcohol.(Wrong)
    She is too young to drink alcohol.(Correct)
    He is not very tough to play football.(Wrong)
    He is not tough enough to play football.(Correct)

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