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Outsider input on my lesson plan

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  • krillenec
    Participant
    27 June, 2015 at 6:53
    • Total posts: 4

    Im about to finnish my TEFL online course at ITTT and have only one step left which is to create my own lesson plan. The students are pre-intermediate and in my lesson im gonna teach them about the contrast between simple present and present continous, the lesson must be one hour long. Before I send my lesson plan I want an outsider input on it. Thank you, Kristoffer

    1. Show the students to their seats and start small talking by asking them questions about sports. Do you play football? Which sport are you in to? How long have you been playing ping pong etc-engange 6 min
    2. Simple present worksheet activity, find someone who…?-5 min
    3. Feedback from the worksheet above-4 min
    4. Pre-teach vocabulary and structures that often are used in sports and sport journalism etc.-Study 6 min
    5. Receptive skill exercise by listening to a conversation from the coursebook on a cd- Study 4 min
    6. Explain on the board the usage and pronunciation of the ing form in present continuos+ drilling-Study 5 min
    7. Worksheet that contains two parts, reading comphrension and gaps filling. Students will be using both simple present and present continous in gaps filling. The text is based around the receptive skill exercise from above-study 7 min
    8. Feedback from the worksheet above-4 min
    9. The students will work in groups creating their own sport. How is it build up? What are the rules etc-activate 10 min
    10. The groups present their sport by using vocabulary that was taught earlier-activate 9 min

    Keith
    Moderator
    27 June, 2015 at 20:29
    • Total posts: 258

    Hi

    You’re on the right track – you’re thinking in the right way in terms of including the necessary stages of the lesson, timing, student interaction, etc.

    Here are a few comments about the different stages of your plan:

    1. Show the students to their seats and start small talking by asking them questions about sports. Do you play football? Which sport are you in to? How long have you been playing ping pong etc-engange 6 min

    This is a good warmer and will serve well to get them thinking about sport. Do you plan for this to be a whole class activity (i.e. with you asking the questions and the students answering) ? This is one way and is fine. Another way that might encourage some more interaction is to have them ask each other these questions in pairs. You can then do some spot feedback (asking a few students what they found out about their partner) at the end of the activity. You could even put up some pictures of different sports around the classroom (maybe some of the sports that will later come up in the listening activity) and ask them to go around these pictures in small groups, discuss what they see and then ask each other if they play this sport…

    2. Simple present worksheet activity, find someone who…?-5 min

    Ok – I assume the aim of this activity to check their existing knowledge of, or to review, present simple. Think about how you could relate this to the theme of the lesson as a whole – will the questions be related to sport? The more you can “tie in” all the stages of the lesson around the main aim and the lesson theme, the better.

    4. Pre-teach vocabulary and structures that often are used in sports and sport journalism etc.-Study 6 min

    This is a good stage to include before the following listening activity. Keep your pre-teaching to just the vocabulary they will need for the listening – it can be tempting to expand this to every vocabulary item to do with sport! If the lesson’s main aim was a vocabulary one, this would be fine, but keep in mind that increasing their range of sports vocabulary is only a secondary aim in this lesson.

    When you say “…and structures” what do you mean exactly?

    5. Receptive skill exercise by listening to a conversation from the coursebook on a cd- Study 4 min
    6. Explain on the board the usage and pronunciation of the ing form in present continuos+ drilling-Study 5 min

    “Receptive skills” is quite broad. I would be a bit more specific here – will you be doing a listening for gist exercise followed by some questions to listen for detailed information, for example? What are the questions you will set for these?

    Does the listening text include examples of present continuous usage? The aim of a listening activity at this stage of the lesson will ideally be to introduce the target language that you will then present or review. Which means we need to think back to the main aim of the lesson, which is to contrast the use of present simple and present continuous. Ideally, then, the listening activity will include examples of both these structures. In stage 6, you would then elicit or present the difference in usage between the two. The worksheet in stage 7 would then follow nicely as a controlled practice activity.

    One other point about stage 6 – when you’re presenting target language, it’s always good to have 3 things in mind: form, meaning and pronunciation. You’ve got meaning (what you’ve called usage) and pronunciation covered. Don’t forget the form – how the target language is constructed (to be + verb + -ing) as well as the interrogative and negative forms.

    9. The students will work in groups creating their own sport. How is it build up? What are the rules etc-activate 10 min
    10. The groups present their sport by using vocabulary that was taught earlier-activate 9 min

    This is a very nice, inventive idea for a freer practice activity. Keep in mind again though the main aim of the lesson (present simple/continuous, not sports vocab). Think about whether or not you can set up this activity to encourage use of these target structures and not only sports vocab. (Think about the kind of language they’ll be using when they create and present their new sport). If the activity doesn’t provide an opportunity to use the target language (regardless of whether or not they then take this opportunity !!) then you might need to change it.

    To sum up:

    – All the elements of the lesson are there and you have some inventive and motivating ideas.
    – When you’re thinking about each stage of the lesson, always keep in mind the main aim of the lesson as a whole. Think about how each stage fits in with achieving this main aim.
    – You may need to be a little more specific with what you plan to do at each stage. For example, in stage 6, how will you explain the usage and pronunciation and how / what will you drill ?

    Good luck – feel free to reply to this post if you have any questions about my comments or want feedback on other ideas / lessons.

    Keith

    krillenec
    Participant
    28 June, 2015 at 15:28
    • Total posts: 4

    Wow thanks for the input it really helped. Im thinking of changing the activity stage to get the students to use present simple and present contentious or can I keep the activity stage and somehow make them use it in the target aim?

    krillenec
    Participant
    28 June, 2015 at 15:46
    • Total posts: 4

    I’m also thinking of changing the engage stage to one of your suggestions. Do you think I should still keep find someone who?

    Keith
    Moderator
    28 June, 2015 at 18:43
    • Total posts: 258

    Im thinking of changing the activity stage to get the students to use present simple and present continuous or can I keep the activity stage and somehow make them use it in the target aim?

    By the activity stage do you mean the last activity where they invent a sport? (Different TEFL course providers have different names that they give to the different stages of the lesson).

    If that’s the stage you mean – I can’t really think of a way that students would naturally use present simple and present continuous with this activity. The key word here is naturally. When you plan a freer practice activity, you need to give students a communicative situation where they can naturally use the target language.

    Now, when doing the activity, they may or may not take this opportunity presented to them – it usually takes a lot of exposure to a language item before learners feel really comfortable using it in a freer communicative activity. But that doesn’t matter – the important thing is that your activity gives them this opportunity.

    Present simple and continuous may well come up when they’re doing the activity you’ve planned, but no more so (and probably a lot less so ! ) than many other grammatical structures. For me, this activity would be a very good one if your target language was imperatives (commands) or modals of obligation and advice (must, have to, should…)

    – First, throw the ball in the air. Next, catch the ball and pass it to someone in your team (imperatives)
    – You mustn’t use your hands. You have to score ten points to win (modals of obligation)

    So, to answer your question, I think I would probably change the activity, unless you can think of a way to set it up or modify it that allows for a lot of natural use of these two structures.

    I’m also thinking of changing the engage stage to one of your suggestions. Do you think I should still keep find someone who?

    By the engage stage, do you mean the first activity? (Again, names given to different stages by different course providers…) I would call this a lead-in.

    It’s true that the Find Someone Who would end up being quite similar to the lead-in / engage activity, in terms of the questions and answers. But the aims of the two stages are different:

    The aim of the lead-in is to set the context for the lesson and warm the students up to the topic by generating interest and getting them thinking about it – you’re activating in their minds a mental image based on their existing knowledge of sport. There is no specific focus on any particular language in this stage of the lesson.

    The aim of your Find Someone Who activity though is a language-focused one. You are reviewing / revising the use of present simple. (Reviewing rather than presenting present simple is appropriate at pre-intermediate level because your students should already be very familiar with present simple to talk about habits / repeated actions.)

    So I would keep the Find Someone Who, but maybe think about how you could change the lead-in activity so that the questions and answers are not too similar to those in the Find Someone Who.

    Hope that helps.

    Keith

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by Eslbase.
    • This reply was modified 3 months, 1 week ago by Eslbase.
    krillenec
    Participant
    2 July, 2015 at 2:12
    • Total posts: 4

    Sorry for not replying to all your questions but I follow engage, study, activate model.

    Anyway I send in my lesson plan where the final product looked liked this:
    1. The students divided into small groups will walk around the classroom , looking at pictures of different sports and talk and ask questions about the pictures. “Do you know how to play this sport? Do you like it? Have you ever played it? etc. During the lesson, I will make a short spot feedback by asking some students what they have found out about others . This is not only to make the students being apart of the class but also to activate everyones English language by conversation.

    2. The students will now use the knowledge about their friends by getting a worksheet called find someone who…? In this worksheet the students will get several questions that always start with ”find someone who” and continue with a sport related questions, for example “find someone who has riden a horse”. Now the student must find someone in the class who has riden a horse and write his/her name. In this exercise the students will use present simple and the main goal is reviewing/revising their use of present simple.

    3. Short feedback from the activity above with the goal to activate the students with their talking and thinking in English by going through the questions from the worksheet with the whole class.

    4. Pre-teach vocabulary that are often used in sport and sport journalism that might seem hard for the students. The aim is to teach vocabulary that will be common during the lesson.

    5. Students will now sit down with their textbooks and read as they listen to a conversation from CD. The text is about two people taking the bus to a football field where they talk about hobbies and sport. The conversation and text will introduce the students to present continuous and also help them practice the receptive skills reading and listening.

    6. Elicit on the whiteboard the difference between these two tense: present simple and present continuous and how the -ing form is constructed in affirmative (subject+aux. verb ‘be’+verb+ing), negative (subject+aux. verb ‘be’+not+verb+ing) and interrogative (aux. verb ‘be’+subject+verb+ing) sentence ,also in their meaning and pronunciation.

    7. Worksheet activity that is in two parts. One reading comprehension with a text based around the conversation from the activity above and one gap filling exercise with questions from the text. To complete the worksheet the students will need to use both simple present and present continuous in the gap filling. For example Which sport does John play? The answer to this question is He plays football which is a simple present. Another example is What are John doing close to the goal? The answer to this question is He is shooting the ball which is a present continuous. This exercise is for practice and use their new knowledge of the difference between the two tense.

    8. Feedback from the worksheet above. In this feedback we will take time by going through the questions and see if everyone in the class has understood the context of the task.

    9. Group work with preperation for the game “That’s strange, they usually…”. Here each group shall write about one sport event where one from each group describs it as a sport commentary. The two others in the group will come up with the commentary “That’s strange, they usually…”.
    For example “He’s heading the ball towards the net” and “That’s strange. He never tries to score himself” or “He always does that, but he rarely scores that way”.

    10. Each group will now play “That’s strange, they usually…” In front of the class and show their sport event and commentaries by using simple present, present continuous and sport vocabulary that they learned earlier.

    It didnt end well and I got this answer:
    Engage – This stage is fine. No corrections needed.

    2. Study – The activity you are starting the study with encourages the use of the present perfect, “Find someone who has ridden a horse?” rather than the present simple. This is not advised as you want to keep the focus on the present simple and present continuous. You also need to bear in mind that as this is a lesson to contrast the two tenses the students would have already studied both in previous lessons. You would not contrast two tenses if you were introducing either of them for the first time.

    3. For this lesson you need to choose one usage from each tense that you think will work well to demonstrate the differences (actions in progress and commentaries would work well with your sports theme). As the students have already studied both tenses they should be aware of these usages as well as the structures. You want to elicit this information from them at the start of the study rather than simply explaining it to them. Everything that you intend to elicit (example sentences, the two usages, structures) should be given in the lesson plan procedure and written on the board. Once this information has been elicited, the teacher should follow up with clarification of the differences and providing more examples to help with the explanation. After you have done this the students should complete worksheets/exercises that enable them to show they understand why one tense is used instead of another.

    4. With regard to the sports vocabulary that you are introducing in this lesson, it would be better to use a vocabulary point the students are already familiar with otherwise you may have too much to cover in the lesson. In this case you can assume the student have already learned the necessary vocabulary and a quick review at the end of the study stage would be sufficient.

    So I have re edited my lesson plan to fit. This is how it looked like now:
    The students divided into small groups will walk around the classroom , looking at pictures of different sports and talk and ask questions about the pictures. “Do you know how to play this sport? Do you like it? Have you ever played it? Etc. This is not only to make the students being apart of the class but also to activate everyones English language by conversation.-engage

    Short feedback where I contionue with the sport theme and pictures by asking questions. What did you find out about your friends? How long have you played soccer? Etc.-engage

    Elicit usage (By eliciting the words I play football and I am playing football), structure and sentences of simple present and present contionue tense on the board.-study 

    Contionue by showing more examples on the board to demonstrate and explain the diffrences between the two tense. For exampel…-study

    Students will now listen to a conversation on CD about two people taking the bus to a football field, where they use a lot of present simple and present contionus by talking about sports.-study

    Worksheet exercise that consist of two parts, reading comprehnsion and gaps filling. In reading comprehnsion the students has to read a text based around the conversation from above while in gaps filling the students will get questions that can only be answered in simple present or present contionus. For exampel Which sport does John play? The answer to this question is He plays football which is a simple present. Another example is What are John doing close to the goal? The answer to this question is He is shooting the ball.-study

    Feedback from the worksheet above. In this feedback we will take time by going through the questions and see if everyone in the class has understood the context of the task.-study     

    Quick review of sport vocabulary from previous lessons.-study

    Group work (4 groups with 3 in each group) that its a preparation for the activity “That’s strange, they usually…”. Here each group shall write about one sport event where one from each group describs it as a sport commentary abd the two other saying how usual or unusal those things are. For this activity the student will only use usages of present simple and present contionue that have been taught in the activities above.-activate

    Each group will now play “That’s strange, they usually…” In front of the class and show their sport event and commentaries by using the contrast of present simple and present contionus tense.-activate      

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