Italy

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  • jder
    Participant
    17 January, 2011 at 15:25
    • Total posts: 20

    Has anyone taught in Italy before? What can you expect in terms of pay, hours, directors? I’m thinking about teaching in Italy after taking some time in the US, and any information would be great. Also, how important is it for the language schools that teachers speak Italian?

    alextj
    Participant
    24 January, 2011 at 14:59
    • Total posts: 11

    Reply To: Italy

    Hi jder,

    It’s not essential to be able to speak in Italian if you’re working in the larger cities (my Italian was terrible or non-existent for the first couple of years in Italy) but it’s definitely a hinderance in the smaller towns, though more on a social and personal level than professional.

    As for the other questions, there’s not a short, simple answer. Eslbase has a good page of comments somewhere from teachers, plus there’s also this FAQ on teaching in Italy that we put together covering contracts, important Italian words, tax, pay, etc:
    http://www.tjtaylor.net/english/teachin … advice.htm

    Hope it helps,
    Alex

    ICAL_Pete
    Participant
    25 January, 2011 at 11:35
    • Total posts: 149

    Reply To: Italy

    [quote]Has anyone taught in Italy before? What can you expect in terms of pay, hours, directors? I’m thinking about teaching in Italy after taking some time in the US, and any information would be great. Also, how important is it for the language schools that teachers speak Italian?[/quote]

    It’s variable in terms of directors; I had a very good one for a few years but there are – like all countries – different stories from other teachers.

    Each school is different when it comes to pay. At the lower end of the market you will find schools paying 12 – 15 euro per hour (often large chains pay this little). Small concerns will go from 15 – 20 euro per hour and privat colleges 20 – 35 per hour. Bigger concerns and more exclusive schools (sometimes funded by the EU) can go up much higher.

    And as mentioned, speaking Italian is useful outside the classroom, especially in smaller places since many Italians don’t speak English.

    TEFL in Italy: http://teflworldwiki.com/index.php/Italy

    jder
    Participant
    29 January, 2011 at 21:04
    • Total posts: 20

    Reply To: Italy

    Thank you for your feedback and links. I have been researching all about Italy but I prefer to hear it from people who have been there and done it. Thanks again.

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