Home TEFL forum Grammar & Vocabulary "In case of" and "on your mind, "in mind" question

"In case of" and "on your mind, "in mind" question

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  • KeithH
    Participant
    19 March, 2009 at 11:42
    • Total posts: 8

    How would I explain to a 10 year old girl the meaning of "in case of", "in case" and "on your mind", "in mind" ?

    This girl is pretty sharp for her age and she has stumped me with a few questions. She wanted to know why the days of the week are named what they are. I found that out but am stumped on the above.

    Thanks!
    Keith

    phil
    Participant
    22 March, 2009 at 19:14
    • Total posts: 55

    Reply To: "In case of" and "on your mind, "in mind" question

    These are best explained with contexts and examples:

    "In case" could be something like:

    I’ll take my umbrella in case it rains.

    Concept check:

    1. It’s raining. Do I take my umbrella? Yes.
    2. It’s not raining. Do I take my umbrella? Yes.

    Compare this with:

    I’ll take my umbrella if it rains.

    1. It’s raining. Do I take my umbrella? Yes.
    2. It’s not raining. Do I take my umbrella? No.

    "In case of" has the same meaning but different form:

    – in case + subject + verb
    – in case of + noun

    "On your mind" and "in mind" form parts of fixed expressions, and really need to be presented in this way with some examples, rather than in isolation:

    – What’s on your mind?
    – It’s been on my mind for a while.
    – He’s got something on his mind.
    – I’ll keep it in mind.

    Phil

    KeithH
    Participant
    26 March, 2009 at 10:25
    • Total posts: 8

    Reply To: "In case of" and "on your mind, "in mind" question

    Thank you, Phil! Much appreciated!

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