Home TEFL forum Teaching & Methodology Help with some ideas re: error correction and context.

Help with some ideas re: error correction and context.

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  • ljkp88
    Participant
    8 February, 2016 at 14:05
    • Total posts: 1

    Hello all.

    Soon I will be doing short in-house sessions for my colleagues on setting context and error correction. I have been teaching for a few years but this is the first time that I have done anything like this, so I thought that it might be an idea to canvass a bit of opinion on the internet, rather than relating back to my own experience and referencing academic texts.

    If anybody could offer some opinions in response to the following questions, or relate things that they have learned from their own experiences it would be greatly apprechiated.

    – How much of an influence does context have on what students learn during the rest of the class?

    – What makes a good context? Could you give any examples of contexts that work/don’t work in textbooks?

    – If you are working through a textbook and come across a context that is particularly dry, or that you think won’t work with your class, what do you do?

    – How much error correction should be done throughout the lesson, and how much should be left to the end?

    – What methods and activities do you use in error correction? Why do they work?

    Any ideas would be much appreciated!

    dan
    Moderator
    8 March, 2016 at 9:09
    • Total posts: 758

    Hi

    – How much of an influence does context have on what students learn during the rest of the class?

    Context can have a very strong influence on learning. Contextual information allows learners to use what we call top-down processing to help them understand. Have a look here for more on this.

    – What makes a good context? Could you give any examples of contexts that work/don’t work in textbooks?

    A good context is one which is relevant to the learners’ interests, needs or motivations. So it’s difficult to make generalisations about which contexts work or don’t work – some will work with some learners, others will work with other learners, depending on, as mentioned above, their interests, needs and motivations.

    – If you are working through a textbook and come across a context that is particularly dry, or that you think won’t work with your class, what do you do?

    Either change the context entirely or try to adapt it in such a way that it will be relevant in some way to my learners.

    Hope that helps!

    Dan

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