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  • choupii
    Participant
    30 March, 2014 at 19:15
    • Total posts: 4

    What CCQs can I have for these two sentences

    you’d better hurry up

    Is the person giving you strong advice ?
    Does this sentence refer to the future?
    Do you have to accpet the advice ?
    Is it better to follow the advice?


    We were only told the next day

    phil
    Participant
    1 April, 2014 at 5:42
    • Total posts: 55

    Reply To: CCQ

    You’d better hurry up

    First, we need to be clear that it’s "you’d better" that we’re checking the concept of, and not "hurry up". So let’s assume that the students are happy with the meaning of "hurry up".

    Now, what are the key elements in the meaning of "you’d better"? I would say:

    – I’m not hurrying up now
    – You think it’s a very good idea for me to hurry up
    – It’s not an obligation to hurry up
    – I might have a problem if I don’t hurry up (I might miss my train, for example)

    Looking at your questions:

    Is the person giving you strong advice ?
    Does this sentence refer to the future?
    Do you have to accpet the advice ?
    Is it better to follow the advice?

    You’re thinking along the right lines. The first question is okay, as long as you can be sure that your students are happy with the meaning of "strong advice". The second one is a bit vague for me – I don’t think it’s necessary in this case. The third one is good (again, if they are happy with the meaning of advice). The fourth one uses one of the words from the target language (better) so could confuse matters.

    So, I would go with something like:

    – Am I hurrying up now?
    – Is it an obligation for me to hurry up?
    – Is it a good idea for me to hurry up?
    – Might I have a problem if I don’t hurry up?

    Depending on the context that you’re presenting this in, you could follow up the last question with "Why?" or "What problem?" – imagine your situation is that the person is running late for a train. The answer to "Why?" would then be "You might miss your train".

    If the students don’t yet know the meaning of "hurry up", then it would be best to choose another verb after "You’d better…" – it becomes a lot more difficult (and I wouldn’t advise it) to concept check two items at the same time.

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