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What are the best/cheap TEFL courses?

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  • mbsamaniego
    Participant
    22 April, 2014 at 1:53
    • Total posts: 3

    I’m interested in getting my TEFL certification this summer, but I wanted to know more information on some accreditation courses.

    Why do some websites offer a 160 hour online courses for about maybe $240 USD… and some websites offer them for almost a grand?

    Can someone recommend me a legit course online that’s under a grand?

    Thank you so much in advance!

    Briona
    Participant
    24 April, 2014 at 14:48
    • Total posts: 52

    Online TEFL certificates are much of a muchness

    Hi there,

    Online TEFL certificates are much of a muchness. There is no single governing body for TEFL so none of the courses are internationally recognised or accredited (despite providers’ claims to the contrary). However, if a school accepts online qualifications, any of them will do.

    Be advised that some employers (and indeed whole countries) point-blank refuse to accept online TEFL certificates. This is because the courses don’t include the all-important teaching practice. Note that the classroom-based element of online/combined courses is NOT equivalent to the observed and assessed teaching practice on a more intensive face-to-face course. On the former, you ‘teach’ your fellow trainees, whereas on the latter, you teach real students.

    Before choosing a course, think about where you want to teach and do some research into that country’s requirements. Otherwise, you may find that your cheap investment turns out to be a bum deal.

    Briona

    mbsamaniego
    Participant
    24 April, 2014 at 15:22
    • Total posts: 3

    This makes me feel very very discouraged now. :(

    FrancaisDeutsch
    Participant
    24 April, 2014 at 23:37
    • Total posts: 57

    It depends where you want to teach

    Hello,

    The first and most important question: Where to you want to teach? If you want to teach in Asia, then a reputable online certificate of at least 100 hours is most befitting for your situation. Do know that TEFL training is many times not even required to teach in Japan and South Korea, even at reputable schools with good pay (just a Bachelor’s in any field). And they make no distinction in quality often times between online and on-site courses. Also, in Turkey, for example, they will usually ask for some certificate, no matter the mode you receive it in. There are, however, times when an on-site is supposedly required. But I would still apply if you have at least a Bachelor’s degree with a good online certificate of least 100-150 hours. In Eastern Europe, they will do the same as in Turkey. So don’t shy away from applying as your credentials "as is" (degree + online cert.) should suffice.

    All that said above, you will undoubtedly need an on-site course like a Celta to teach at a reputable school in Western Europe. That is the general rule. Only exceptions would be if you were to have a Bachelor’s or Master’s in TEFL. In the high-paying oil countries of the Middle East, an on-site Celta does little: you need at least a Bachelor’s in TEFL, linguistics, etc, preferably a Master’s in these sorts of fields.

    Online courses can be fantastic, and they’re way cheaper. And, yes, many are most reputable and can easily give you an edge in Asia where many schools – as I said above – still don’t ask for any training. Some online courses even have a teaching practicum that can be arranged for you at some university or language school in your area (not required, though), if you really believe you may need this (never a bad idea).

    At least do one that is reputable like LinguaEdge that is at least a 100 hours for your own good (less hours is not worth it). I did, and it wasn’t easy, but very, very helpful in understanding the basics of TEFL. It can only make your transition smoother while making the money your students spend more worth it. I still can’t believe how much I learned in my course – amazing course and an amazing instructor!

    Please believe me and stay positive.

    Best of luck and keep us well-informed! :D

    mbsamaniego
    Participant
    25 April, 2014 at 1:43
    • Total posts: 3

    Thank you so much for the information.

    To answer your question, I am interested in teaching in Asia.. My main goal was South Korea but I heard need a Bachelors for that =/

    FrancaisDeutsch
    Participant
    25 April, 2014 at 13:49
    • Total posts: 57

    You need a degree and a TEFL/TESOL cert for South Korea or Japan

    Yes, you do need a Bachelor’s to teach in South Korea and Japan for the work visa. So you may be out of luck in these places. Try China or a few countries in Southeast Asia. I think Thailand, though, is asking more and more for Bachelor degrees (at one time you needed practically nothing but be a native Engish speaker). In today’s world, you will need some certification in TESOL, be it online or on-site. So best bet would be to find a country where an online course will suffice alone, considering you don’t have a Bachelor’s degree. I’m thinking full-on Laos, somewhat Thailand, perhaps some areas of China, Indonesia… But, again, maybe you’ll have no interest at all in these countries,

    Best of luck in your future endeavors! You’ll find something good coming your way. :D

    TrevLite
    Participant
    10 July, 2014 at 14:32
    • Total posts: 5

    Try a TEFL internship

    Online TEFL’s are accepted in most places in the world. The only places they might not be accepted will be places that have other much higher requirements, such as a state provided teaching certification, a Master in Linguistics, TESOL or related etc. Then a TEFL won’t help much. For 90% of the positions out there, a TEFL is going to make you much more competitive, online or not.

    If you don’t have a bachelor degree that limits your choices. I suggest considering a TEFL internship like this one > http://mytefl.net/internships/teach_in_china. It’s paid, and from what I understand often leads to full time employment offers in country.

    lip420
    Participant
    17 December, 2014 at 22:36
    • Total posts: 12

    In most of Eastern Asia you don’t need a TEFL certificate

    Hi there,

    Online TEFL certificates are much of a muchness. There is no single governing body for TEFL so none of the courses are internationally recognised or accredited (despite providers’ claims to the contrary). However, if a school accepts online qualifications, any of them will do.

    Be advised that some employers (and indeed whole countries) point-blank refuse to accept online TEFL certificates. This is because the courses don’t include the all-important teaching practice. Note that the classroom-based element of online/combined courses is NOT equivalent to the observed and assessed teaching practice on a more intensive face-to-face course. On the former, you ‘teach’ your fellow trainees, whereas on the latter, you teach real students.

    Before choosing a course, think about where you want to teach and do some research into that country’s requirements. Otherwise, you may find that your cheap investment turns out to be a bum deal.

    Briona

    A TEFL certificate is “internationally recognized” by it’s very nature. No, an online course won’t be accepted at every school, but neither will an in-class course. Different schools have different requirements.

    It depends on where you want to teach and the school. In my experience teaching in Asia for 6 years I can’t recall seeing a job ad that said you must have an in-class course. In most of Eastern Asia you don’t legally need a certificate to begin with.

    I’d say that in Eastern Asia the schools that require in-class courses are few and far between, like less than 5% of the job pool. And the schools that require them will have other requirements such as experience.


    Taught English in Taiwan, China & Korea. Here’s an online TEFL course that you’ll probably like especially if you teach kids in Asia: http://www.course.eslinsider.com/

    Modesto
    Participant
    29 December, 2014 at 23:51
    • Total posts: 1

    Read reviews and don’t pay less than a grand for your TEFL course

    I read somewhere that anything under a grand for an online TEFL course couldn’t be any good. I wish I had paid attention, I wouldn’t be struggling to get back $265 I’ve just thrown down the drain for one of those 120 hour self called ‘courses’.

    Be really careful with the reviews too. If you find something where more than 95% of the ‘students’ are satisfied more than 8/10, that doesn’t happen in real life either. They will even let the odd one out not too satisfied, or, as one of them called it ‘outrageously disappointed’, to make it appear more real.

    Best of luck though, you’ll need a good dose of it!!

    FrancaisDeutsch
    Participant
    6 January, 2015 at 16:34
    • Total posts: 57

    A 150 hour online course can be enough

    I kindly disagree: My little 150-hour online certificate gave me a real edge in applying to jobs in the Far East. These courses can be a sure way to a higher salary and can easily put your candidacy at the top of the pile. In addition, I obtained a good grasp of the EFL industry (grammar, lesson planning, types of learners, etc.) – all most practical in the real world.

    ^In Europe, these certificates would do very little, however, to land yourself a decent job. It may be the case in other parts of the world and in certain schools, too.

    I would never discourage any person from doing such a course, provided it’s a reputable one like LinguaEdge, etc.

    ayeshasatchiwala
    Participant
    21 January, 2015 at 15:25
    • Total posts: 2

    Try the Teach TEFL First course

    I was contemplating a career change and found this course to be a worthwhile investment. Just midway through it one starts to feel confident and looks forward to working in a school environment. From what I’ve learnt from this course, I want to join up EFL teaching and invest further in a graduate level qualification.

    The course provides the essential guidelines for teaching English to non–native speakers of the language at different levels. Also, for those of us who are also non- native speakers of the language and want to teach English, the course is extremely useful as it provides a basic grounding of some of the broader areas of focus in language teaching. The course modules are structured well and cover a number areas such as Classroom Management, Lesson Plans, Phonology, Grammar and Verb Tenses and overtime became more difficult and requiring more time and attention. In addition to the essential reading materials, the course participant is able to access additional resources to get a more broader overview and critique of the subject and lots of information about useful websites.
    In some ways, English Phonology (Module 8) was definitely the most enjoyable and perhaps the easiest I’ve studied so far. What made it interesting and thoroughly enjoyable for me was the fact that this made EFL teaching fun and doable as it also provides the course participant with some with practical examples and an idea about the kind of drills and games a teacher could deploy in a classroom setting to help teach more effectively.

    As a teacher who will be working primarily at the Kindergarten level, I am looking forward to practical teaching, developing lesson plans and aim sheets etc for specific age group and level of students through direct classroom style interaction. At times one does however wish that the course could be extended with a few additional hours in a classroom, possibly arranged by locally accredited EFL Teaching Institutes where the course participant is provided the opportunity to apply their learning and develop skills as well as graded on their performance.

    ayeshasatchiwala
    Participant
    21 January, 2015 at 15:26
    • Total posts: 2

    Apologies – and by that I meant the Teach TEFL First 100 hr course! http://www.teachteflfirst.com

    awalls86
    Participant
    9 February, 2015 at 4:35
    • Total posts: 11

    Do a CELTA or Trinity to be taken seriously

    There’s an old quote along the lines of education is expensive, but so is no education!

    In my opinion, the only two TEFL courses worth doing are the CELTA and the Trinity. At least, they are the only worthwhile courses as an entry level qualification assuming you do not have some other teaching qualification e.g. a PGCE.

    Yes, you do not need them to get work, and some online TEFL course may help you a bit. You will be taken more seriously if you have one of these. Maybe you are not serious and just looking to backpack for a year?

    Increasingly employers seem to demand one of these two courses or equivalent, and whilst some might argue that it is wrong, the general consensus seems to fall on the side of the fence that they are superior offerings to any weekend or online offering.

    I think eventually you will find that all countries become tighter on what you need to be an English teacher, so if you’re in it for a mid to long term, then you may as well invest in such a qualification.

    You will probably find most countries you also need a degree for visa purposes. Check very carefully about this. China is apparently cracking down on those without the correct visa, or visas obtained with dodgy papers. You may even find a recruiter invents a degree certificate if you don’t have one.


    Need ideas? Check out my blog at http://www.teflup.com – TEFL Up: Next level ideas

    jamesjett
    Participant
    5 September, 2017 at 4:34
    • Total posts: 2

    Try gettefl.com

    I just got my 120 hour TEFL course with http://www.gettefl.com …this is a great course! I highly recommend it. The TEFL course is based on 10 years of feedback from employers so you learn how to do your job properly so you can keep your job. I learned so many practical hands on teaching techniques that are extremely helpful in the classroom.

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