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Advice which is better course? (14 posts)

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User avatar
nana
Posted on 4 Jun 2009 20:01
Total posts: 3
Hi, I live out in the middle of nowhere, and I can't afford to move to take a on-site course like CELTA. Therefore, can anyone tell me if i-to-i 100hour course or teflonline.com is a better online course? I want to make the right decision, so please respond to my post if anyone knows.

User avatar
ICAL_Pete
Posted on 10 Jun 2009 12:59
Total posts: 149
You might find it useful to check the posts on independent sites like TEFL Course Review. This is a site where TEFL courses and course providers are independently
reviewed and rated by people who’ve actually taken the course. It will allow you to compare different TEFL course providers.
ICAL Quality Online TEFL Training since 1998

User avatar
nana
Posted on 14 Jun 2009 16:16
Total posts: 3
Thank you for your advice. Actually, I had already looked at that website, which is why I was unsure which course to take. There were more reviews for i-to-i, but some of them were really bad, and I liked the course modules on teflonline.com better. However, the lack of reviews on teflonline made me uneasy. I will check out the course you mentioned in addition to the ones I am already researching. Thank you again.

User avatar
jbenloulou
Posted on 14 Aug 2009 11:48
Total posts: 3
Hey Nana,

I'm not sure I'd recommend doing an online course. I took a TEFL course almost 4 years ago in Prague called TEFL Worldwide Prague (http://www.teflworldwideprague.com)and have been teaching ever since. A lot of the language schools I have worked for would not accept an online course as '"certified" simply due to the fact that there was no hands on teaching experience, you know what i mean? The 4 week course I took on the other hand really just threw us in the water the 2nd day ( i had never been in front of a classroom up until that point) and it was up to us to either sink or swim. Once those jitters were out of the way, it was much easier to focus on different types of teaching practices and the methodologies involved in teaching English to foreigners. Hope that helped!

User avatar
pbambace
Posted on 30 Sep 2009 13:38
Total posts: 1
I am also looking into the TEFL Worldwide course in Prague. The only reviews I found online were from 3-4 years ago. Has anyone done this course recently? There are no reviews on the course review website...but it was very nice to see that someone posted on here who's taken the course. I was also curious if you were an American or EU citizen?

How likely is it for an American to get a TEFL job in Europe, due to needing a visa? The website for this course does not mention anything about that.

Thanks everyone!
Peggy

User avatar
ICAL_Pete
Posted on 1 Oct 2009 8:44
Total posts: 149
pbambace wrote:I am also looking into the TEFL Worldwide course in Prague. The only reviews I found online were from 3-4 years ago. Has anyone done this course recently? There are no reviews on the course review website...but it was very nice to see that someone posted on here who's taken the course.


!! :roll:

pbambace wrote:How likely is it for an American to get a TEFL job in Europe, due to needing a visa? The website for this course does not mention anything about that.


Unfortunately it's almost impossible. You have to be really well qualified and experienced and the school also needs to prove that they cannot find a teacher from a European country who can do the job. In effect, this means it's not going to happen unless you are an exceptional teacher with plenty of experience; the school has to go through a LOT of bureaucratic hassle to get the papers so in general they just find it easier to employ a British or Irish teacher.
ICAL Quality Online TEFL Training since 1998

User avatar
Renee
Posted on 11 Aug 2010 11:47
Total posts: 1
pbambace wrote:How likely is it for an American to get a TEFL job in Europe, due to needing a visa? The website for this course does not mention anything about that.


pbambace wrote:Unfortunately it's almost impossible. You have to be really well qualified and experienced and the school also needs to prove that they cannot find a teacher from a European country who can do the job. In effect, this means it's not going to happen unless you are an exceptional teacher with plenty of experience; the school has to go through a LOT of bureaucratic hassle to get the papers so in general they just find it easier to employ a British or Irish teacher.



That is simply not true. I am American and I have been legally working in Europe for a year and a half now, and am currently in the process of renewing my visa for the third time. The process isn't fun, but it's doable in some European countries. I am a grad of the TEFL Worldwide course, and know many other people who have taken it. I have American friends who have legally worked in Germany, Poland, Slovakia, Russia, Hungary, and other Eastern European countries. I also know people who succesfully found "under the table" work in Western countries including Spain, Italy and France with no troubles. I also know of a couple of graduates who obtained legal work in Spain, complete with a visa and a work permit. (I thought about moving to Spain 6 months ago and was provided with their contact information to aid in my job search.) The great majority of us were brand new teachers with a university and a TEFL certificate with limited (if any) relevant work experience. The opportunities are out there, you just have to find them and take advantage of them. TEFL WW has many contacts throughout the world and will do anything they can to help you find a job, and their guidance is lifetime. Two of my (American) friends just moved to Spain and have been given a lot of information about finding jobs there.

It's true that the school will have to prove they can't hire an EU citizen, but they can make it much more specific than that. Just requiring that the candidate be a native speaker drastically limits the options, and there is a larger demand for native speakers than the UK is able to provide. I had some issues when I was first applying for my visa so I am quite familiar with the process and how it works.

User avatar
IEN training
Posted on 26 Oct 2010 13:57
Total posts: 4
Hi,

I agree with Renee. It's true that's it takes a while to get the visa and some schools won't bother to do it, but the big ones do. I work in the IEN Barcelona (Institute of North American Studies) and we get visas for 4 or 5 teachers every year. Most of our teaching staff is American. The non-native and natives (non-American) that work here were mostly hired during Bush' government as then it was nearly impossible to get visas. Now, it's back to "normal", so it takes about 3-6 months to get it and the teacher needs to be in the USA while doing the paperwork.
About experience and qualifications. Well, as all schools, it depends on how "desperate" you are. If you really need a teacher, the minimum is to have a Trinity CertTESOL or CELTA and some experience to start as we have a mentoring program for new teachers during the first year. That way, someone helps you adapt to the school and to teaching full-time. If we're talking plenty of options to choose from, then we'd require teachers to have a MA in Linguistics and TEFL qualifications plus 2 years experience.

Carol Ibanez
www.ien.es

User avatar
raychill
Posted on 30 Aug 2012 22:41
Total posts: 3
I spoke with a representative from TEFL yesterday who told me that in Spain they do not require a college degree. She said that someone could go anywhere in the world and teach English but would be paid less depending on his/her degree. As is true with most things in life one is able to make more money te higher level of education he/she has. How true is this for teaching in Spain with a TEFL certification?

User avatar
dan
Posted on 31 Aug 2012 10:59
Total posts: 510
As is true with most things in life one is able to make more money te higher level of education he/she has. How true is this for teaching in Spain with a TEFL certification?


In most of the schools I've worked you could be a newly qualified teacher with an entry level certificate, or have a Delta (this is a higher level qualification) and 10 years experience, and you'd be on more or less the same pay. Having a univeristy degree or not doesn't tend to make much difference in terms of pay (although not having one will prevent you from working in some countries).

Now, there are some jobs in some countries where requirements in general are higher to start with, and the pay is also higher. In some Middle Eastern countries, for example, an employer might require an MA in TESOL and 5 years experience,and pay you £30,000 tax free. But it's difficult to know what a lower qualified teacher would earn in this situation because he or she wouldn't be given the job in the first place.

To earn more than another teacher in a country like Spain you'd normally need to hold a position of higher responsibility such as a Young Learner Coordinator or Director of Studies.

Dan

User avatar
dan
Posted on 31 Aug 2012 11:02
Total posts: 510
I spoke with a representative from TEFL yesterday

This quote worries me a bit. For someone to claim to be a "representative of TEFL" is quite an extraordinary claim to be making. TEFL is a profession, not the name of a particular qualification or organisation, so I'd love to meet the person who claims to be representing the profession as a whole, or who is misleading people (whether intentionally or not) into thinking that this is the case.

User avatar
Chris Westergaard
Posted on 13 Feb 2013 10:39
Total posts: 19
Generally if you can afford an onsite, it will take you a lot further than an online course.

Regardless of which kind of course you are looking at check to see what post course job assistance they offer and get in contact with recent graduates to see where they ended up.

That's a full proof method. The course that is more connected with their graduates and have a higher success rate of finding work for them, will be more willing to offer up this contact.

User avatar
ITTP
Posted on 19 Feb 2013 17:44
Total posts: 13
I would be extremely wary of some of the TEFL review websites out there which claim to be independent, especially those which run TEFL school advertising on their sites. We had a very unpleasant experience with a couple of these sites last year after receiving some unusual negative reviews and the behavior of the owners demonstrated to us that perhaps their insistence of being independent and unbiased wasn't exactly reflected in real terms.
We recommend http://www.tefl-courses-reviews.com (previously tefl-reviews.com) because they don't promote any TEFL school advertising and experience has shown to us that they really evaluate each and every review which is published on their site.

Hope it helps!
Neville :-)

ITTP TEFL Prague / ITTP TEFL Online:
http://www.tefl-tesol-online.com

User avatar
Tommybuttler
Posted on 5 May 2014 6:35
Total posts: 2
It is not impossible to job as an English teacher if you are American...I lived in Prague for a while and saw the ads on expats.cz, its filled with ads with places looking for native english speaker teachers.

*** MOD EDIT ***

I say if you are thinking about Europe, Czech Republic and Hungary are great places for it - low cost of living and high demand for english teachers

ICAL_Pete wrote:
pbambace wrote:I am also looking into the TEFL Worldwide course in Prague. The only reviews I found online were from 3-4 years ago. Has anyone done this course recently? There are no reviews on the course review website...but it was very nice to see that someone posted on here who's taken the course.


!! :roll:

pbambace wrote:How likely is it for an American to get a TEFL job in Europe, due to needing a visa? The website for this course does not mention anything about that.


Unfortunately it's almost impossible. You have to be really well qualified and experienced and the school also needs to prove that they cannot find a teacher from a European country who can do the job. In effect, this means it's not going to happen unless you are an exceptional teacher with plenty of experience; the school has to go through a LOT of bureaucratic hassle to get the papers so in general they just find it easier to employ a British or Irish teacher.



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